Guide

Types of consent

In this guide


Development approval consists of one or more types of consent granted during the assessment process.

The consents required for your development depend on what is being proposed and where it is located.

Which consents apply

There are two different planning systems operating in South Australia which set out the consents that apply.

Urban areas are included in "Phase Three" of the planning reform implementation. These parts of South Australia will transition to the new planning system in late 2020.

List of Phase Three areas (PDF, 446 KB)

Development approval in urban areas is set out by the Development Act 1993 and may require:

  • Development plan consent
  • Building rules consent
  • Land division consent

Development plan consent

Required for development that may have a planning impact on its surrounding area, for example:

  • Building or extending a house
  • Changing the use of land from an office to a shop
  • Removing a significant tree

Development plan consent is granted by assessing the development against the planning rules to minimise any negative impacts on the surrounding area. A negative impact may be overlooking, overshadowing, increased noise or poor access.

Planning consent is usually granted by a local council. Occasionally, the State Planning Commission will grant consent for certain developments.

Building rules consent

Required for development that involves building work, for example:

  • Building a carport or garage
  • Building a swimming pool
  • Demolition

Building rules consent is granted by assessing the development against the building rules to ensure building work will be undertaken in a safe and compliant way.

A building rules consent may be required even if no building works are proposed. This is because a change in land use may require different building fire safety requirements.

Building rules consent is usually granted by:

Land division consent

Required for development that involves the creation, movement or deletion of land boundaries, for example:

  • Moving the boundary between two allotments
  • Subdividing land into two
  • Amalgamating multiple allotments into one allotment

Land division consent is granted by assessing the development against infrastructure requirements set out by legislation. This ensures the resulting land is appropriately serviced for land use development.

If land division consent is required, the development approval must also include a planning consent.

Land division consent is usually granted by a planner in either state or local government.

Rural areas are included in "Phase Two" of the planning reform implementation. These parts of South Australia transitioned to the new planning system on 31 July 2020.

List of Phase Two areas (PDF, 446 KB)

Development approval in rural areas is set out by the new Planning, Development and Infrastructure Act 2016 and may require:

  • Planning consent
  • Building consent
  • Land division consent

Planning consent

Required for development that may have a planning impact on its surrounding area, for example:

  • Building or extending a house
  • Changing the use of land from an office to a shop
  • Removing a significant tree

Planning consent is granted by assessing the development against the planning rules to minimise any negative impacts on the surrounding area. A negative impact may be overlooking, overshadowing, increased noise or poor access.

Planning consent is usually granted by:

Occasionally, the State Planning Commission will grant planning consent for certain developments.

Building consent

Required for development that involves building work, for example:

  • Building a carport or garage
  • Building a swimming pool
  • Demolition

Building consent is granted by assessing the development against the building rules to ensure building work will be undertaken in a safe and compliant way.

A building consent may be required even if no building works are proposed. This is because a change in land use may require different building fire safety requirements.

Building consent is usually granted by:

Land division consent

Required for development that involves the creation, movement or deletion of land boundaries, for example:

  • Moving the boundary between two allotments
  • Subdividing land into two
  • Amalgamating multiple allotments into one allotment

Land division consent is granted by assessing the development against infrastructure requirements set out by legislation. This ensures the resulting land is appropriately serviced for land use development.

If land division consent is required, the development approval must also include a planning consent.

Land division consent is usually granted by a planner in either state or local government.

Outback areas are included in "Phase One" of the planning reform implementation. These areas transitioned to the new planning system on 1 July 2019.

Outback areas are parts of South Australia where there is no local council, including coastal waters.

Development approval in outback areas is set out by the new Planning, Development and Infrastructure Act 2016 and may require:

  • Planning consent
  • Building consent
  • Land division consent

Planning consent

Required for development that may have a planning impact on its surrounding area, for example:

  • Building or extending a house
  • Changing the use of land from an office to a shop
  • Removing a significant tree

Planning consent is granted by assessing the development against the planning rules to minimise any negative impacts on the surrounding area. A negative impact may be overlooking, overshadowing, increased noise or poor access.

In outback areas, planning consent is always granted by the State Planning Commission.

Building consent

Required for development that involves building work, for example:

  • Building a carport or garage
  • Building a swimming pool
  • Demolition

Building consent is granted by assessing the development against the building rules to ensure building work will be undertaken in a safe and compliant way.

A building consent may be required even if no building works are proposed. This is because a change in land use may require different building fire safety requirements.

In outback areas, building consent is usually granted by an independent accredited professional.

Land division consent

Required for development that involves the creation, movement or deletion of land boundaries, for example:

  • Moving the boundary between two allotments
  • Subdividing land into two
  • Amalgamating multiple allotments into one allotment

Land division consent is granted by assessing the development against infrastructure requirements set out by legislation. This ensures the resulting land is appropriately serviced for land use development.

If land division consent is required, the development approval must also include a planning consent.

In outback areas, land division consent is granted by the State Planning Commission.

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